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Awards:

Prof. Mark Taylor wins 2016 McLean Award for his

Prof. Mark Taylor wins 2016 McLean Award for his "sweet science"

Prof. Mark Taylor is the recipient of the 2016 McLean Award. Taylor has been recognized for his fundamental research on oligosaccharides, which is furthering our understanding of how cells recognize and interact with each other, and other pathogens. These sugars are part of the basic building blocks of life and may lead to future drug development, and the creation of environmentally friendly polymers. He has also made fundamental studies in the area of halogen bonding intermolecular interactions and the use of organoboron compounds as catalysts.

The McLean Award, endowed by alumnus Mr. William F. McLean, supports the work of an outstanding early career researcher in physics, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, engineering sciences, or the theory and methods of statistics. This is one of UofT’s premiere honours, with just one award made annually to an emerging research leader who is within 12 years of having received their PhD. Congratulations, Mark!

In the News:

A strategy for CO<sub>2</sub> to fuel conversion using silicon nanocrystals: New research from the Ozin lab and UofT Solar Fuels Cluster

A strategy for CO2 to fuel conversion using silicon nanocrystals: New research from the Ozin lab and UofT Solar Fuels Cluster

The UofT Solar Fuels Cluster research team led by Prof. Geoff Ozin has devised a method for the conversion of CO2 to fuel using silicon nanocrystals. They report in Nature Communications that hydride-terminated silicon nanocrystals, which have an average diameter of 3.5 nm, can function as an agent for converting gaseous carbon dioxide selectively to carbon monoxide. Moreover, silicon is low-cost, non-toxic and readily available in sand. This important discovery is highlighted in UofT News.




Research from the Stephan Group highlighted in C&EN

Research from the Stephan Group highlighted in C&EN

The latest research on boron chemistry is featured in a recent issue of C&EN, including recent work from Doug Stephan's group using B(C6F5)3 with a weakly basic solvent for the catalytic hydrogenation of alkyl and aryl ketones to alcohols. Graduate student Lauren E. Longobardi has reported that attempts to apply this strategy to aromatic diones unexpectedly result in the formation of borocyclic radicals that are stable enough to be isolated, and may be useful as catalysts. Researchers have also been applying FLPs in reactions to functionalize organic molecules, showing that FLPs are "not a one-trick pony," says Stephan.




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Pyridinium–phosphonium dications: highly electrophilic phosphorus-based Lewis acid catalysts
Using commercially available 2-pyridyldiphenylphosphine (o-NC5H4)PPh2, a family of electrophilic phosphonium cations [(o-NC5H4)PFPh2]+ (2) and dications [(o-Me...

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